Guest Experience Requires Solid Measurement and Reporting Structure

By Michael Waddell Managing Director, INTEGRITYOne Partners | September 02, 2010

The Hospitality & Leisure industry continues to undergo dramatic changes due to the impact of technology on business travel, the dynamics of geopolitics and its impact on individual behaviors, the changing competitive landscape, and more. As a result, hospitality operators are highly focused on guest loyalty and the product/service and personal attributes that foster return on such loyalty.

Furthermore, globalization and technological forces are accelerating a shift in customer demands toward a desire for services and products that are tailored to individual style and preferences. To be successful, organizations must improve the customer experience and develop lasting customer relationships. These goals can be achieved by de-emphasizing standard offerings for leisure and business travelers, understanding target consumer segments, and embracing models that focus on providing differentiated experiences, customized to meet individual needs. Successful hospitality companies are undertaking key business transformations related to their customers, product and service delivery, business operations, brands, employees, sales and distribution, and deployment of technology.

In order to meet these challenges, companies that truly know their customers and provide premiere products with high levels of service in ways they desire are growing market share and staying ahead of the competition. Subsequently, customer knowledge and the ability to turn that knowledge into processes and technologies that enable measurable guest experience enhancements are critical to this success.

The Challenge

Guest experience research in the Hospitality & Leisure industry takes on various forms. Instruments can range from conversations with guests that provide anecdotal data to short questionnaires measuring key property/personnel attributes on an ongoing basis to comprehensive surveys that capture quantitative feedback on facilities and service attributes, personnel performance, demographic and pricing information, and more.

Each approach carries advantages and disadvantages. However, effective approaches can be built around a recurring tracking survey process that provides a comprehensive view of a property's operations from the guest's perspective, along with the reporting systems and tools that enable executive and on-site management to continually turn knowledge into opportunities for enhanced guest experience.

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