"Generation Y - Our Communication Rules Have Changed"

By Bob Kelleher President and Founder, The Employee Engagement Group | October 09, 2011

Generation Y, also known as the Millennial Generation (Millennials) is the generation following Generation X. Although there is no clear consensus when the Millennial generation starts and ends, most agree that it applies to those born between the mid 1970s to the mid 1990s. Many of them are children of Boomers (those born between the mid 1940’s to mid 1960’s). For purpose of this article, our focus will be on Generation Yers who originate or reside in the US or other western nations.

“We were the same way when we were their age.”

Which is partially true. There are overlapping traits that all generations shared during similar points in time. In watching my three Gen-Y children, I often see myself when I was their age (upper teens and mid 20’s). However, the demographic experts agree today’s Gen-Yers are unique in three very distinct ways: they’re more global than any previous generation, they’re more technically dependent, and they’re the wealthiest generation EVER.

6 Communication Essentials:

1. Leverage Technology

Where Generation X is technologically savvy, Generation Y is technologically dependent. This became obvious to me a few weeks back at my son’s college graduation. Sitting in the large auditorium and looking down proudly on my recent graduate sitting with his 3,000 college graduates, I noticed small glimmers of light on the laps of each graduate. I remarked to my wife how my son’s university was quite thoughtful in providing each graduate a flashlight to look at the program. She laughingly replied, “they’re not using flashlights, they’re texting!”

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Sales & Marketing: Opinions Matter

Hotel Sales and Marketing Directors manage a complex mix of strategies to attract and convert customers into guests. Part of their expertise includes an awareness of customer behavior during the reservation process, so they can make sure their hotel is favorably positioned. One such trend is the growing popularity of travel review sites. According to one recent survey, 61% of prospective customers consult online reviews in order to validate information about the hotel before making a purchasing decision. Another survey found that the average hotel customer reads between 6-12 reviews across 4-10 properties before making a final decision on where to stay. Similarly, other studies have shown that consumer reviews are a more trusted source of information for prospective customers than other kinds of marketing messaging. In fact, reviews are often considered to be as influential as price regarding whether a customer decides to complete a purchase or not. Plus, travel sites with the most reviews - including recent reviews from satisfied customers and thoughtful responses from staff - were also found to be the most appealing. So having positive reviews on a travel website is essential and can help to increase a hotel's conversion rates dramatically. Of course, there are all kinds of additional marketing strategies for sales and marketing directors to consider - the importance of video and the emergence of live streaming; the implementation of voice search; the proliferation of travel bots; and the development of Instagram as an e-commerce platform. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.