How Guest Feedback Aligns with Your Hotel's Top Goals

By Benjamin Jost Co-Founder & CEO, TrustYou | September 10, 2017

In a recent interview, Airbnb co-founder and chief strategy officer Nathan Blecharczyk said their future goals lie in “becoming a platform for the entire trip, so no longer just about accommodations…really trying to reinvent every aspect of travel.”

I believe hoteliers need to think along the same lines: how do we reinvent the travel experience – from search to booking to providing a top-notch experience on-site – to not only compete with the likes of Airbnb but also to achieve your hotel’s top goals?

It starts with taking a step back and first identifying those top goals. Every CEO I speak to is struggling with the same challenges – and I’ve noticed these four things come up as the top goals:

  • Driving direct bookings
  • Lowering distribution costs
  • Increasing hotel revenue
  • Improving guest satisfaction

In these discussions, the next question becomes: okay – so what plan do I need to put into place to achieve those four goals? And then, while they’re putting together that plan, they might ID some areas where guest feedback could be useful to aid that objective.

I challenge hoteliers to think about it in the reverse way: how can guest feedback help you achieve each of those four goals so that you use guest feedback across your entire customer journey (and not as an afterthought)?

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