How Guest Feedback Aligns with Your Hotel's Top Goals

By Benjamin Jost Co-Founder & CEO, TrustYou | September 10, 2017

In a recent interview, Airbnb co-founder and chief strategy officer Nathan Blecharczyk said their future goals lie in "becoming a platform for the entire trip, so no longer just about accommodations…really trying to reinvent every aspect of travel."

I believe hoteliers need to think along the same lines: how do we reinvent the travel experience – from search to booking to providing a top-notch experience on-site – to not only compete with the likes of Airbnb but also to achieve your hotel's top goals?

It starts with taking a step back and first identifying those top goals. Every CEO I speak to is struggling with the same challenges – and I've noticed these four things come up as the top goals:

  • Driving direct bookings
  • Lowering distribution costs
  • Increasing hotel revenue
  • Improving guest satisfaction

In these discussions, the next question becomes: okay – so what plan do I need to put into place to achieve those four goals? And then, while they're putting together that plan, they might ID some areas where guest feedback could be useful to aid that objective.

I challenge hoteliers to think about it in the reverse way: how can guest feedback help you achieve each of those four goals so that you use guest feedback across your entire customer journey (and not as an afterthought)?

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Richard Takach, Jr.
Dee Dee Dochen
Drew Rosser
Marco Albarran
Roberta Nedry
Amy Locke
Susie Ross
Cindy Woudenberg
Cid Jenkins
David Hogan
Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.