Are You Properly Managing Your Hotel's Waste Products?

By Maricha Ellis VP of Marketing & Sales Operations, Stericycle Environmental Solutions | November 05, 2017

There are many guidelines and best practices to follow in order to operate a hazardous waste management program that complies with all federal and state regulations. As many hotels are now dedicating a considerable amount of effort and resources to become more environmentally friendly, it's important to make sure their hazardous waste management practices are aligned with their sustainability program goals.

Hazardous waste comes in many different forms and appears in many different areas of a hotel's property. From toiletry items left behind in guest rooms to commonly-used cleaning products, there is no shortage of hazardous waste accumulated in a hotel. There are many best practices to follow when handling hazardous waste on your property, and a foundational understanding of the regulations defining what constitutes hazardous waste is key to laying the groundwork for a proper hazardous waste management program.

The Fundamentals of Hazardous Waste Management

Certain items commonly found in hotels have hazardous properties. Once an item containing these properties becomes no longer usable, it is deemed to be hazardous waste and must be disposed of in accordance with government-mandated guidelines. Because hotels are considered generators of hazardous waste, there are certain federal and state regulations that must be followed in order to avoid penalties and prevent environmental damage.

Passed by Congress in 1976, the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) states that the generator of hazardous waste is responsible for their waste from the time of generation to the final destruction of the waste. Because the waste is generated at your hotel, you are responsible for identifying and storing it correctly. To ensure hazardous waste management is handled in a safe, efficient and compliant manner, hotels typically employ a service provider to customize a program, training and disposal pick up schedule that best suits the unique needs of their property. Once a hazardous waste management service provider picks up the hazardous waste, that organization assumes the responsibility of the waste and transports it to a treatment facility.

What is Considered Hazardous Waste?

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Pedro Colaco
Frank Meek
LeJane Carson
Jason Ferrara
Scott Nadel
Tema Frank
Gini Dietrich
Edward Donaldson
John Welty
Kurt A. Broadhag
Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.