Making the New Hire Our Smart Hire

By Mark Ricketts President & Chief Operating Officer, McNeill Hotels | April 15, 2018

It's been reported that millennials decide within their first 48 hours with an organization whether they will stay on for an extended period of time. Talk about first impressions being the most lasting! 

But when we think about it, first impressions are important for all ages and experience groups. When guests arrive at our properties, the impression of their stay will often be indelibly forged by how things went at its very start. How did check-in go? Was he or she made to feel genuinely welcome by our staff? How did the room present itself upon that first opening of the main door or first peek into the bathroom? How did breakfast look and taste the next morning? And so on.

When we meet with a new supplier or industry partner, again, first impressions count for a great deal. Did we look our new colleague firmly in the eye? Did we ask the right questions or provide the answers that were being sought? The silent grading starts right then and there. The expectations of others and how we match them are essential to our success.

We must put the same care into the acquisition, training and career development process for our new hires. What we do at these stages must reflect what works best for our operating model and how we believe people should be treated within an organization.  Moreover, we must be careful about adjusting core procedures depending on whether the labor market is tight, or looser, at any given time.  Perhaps, above all else, we must be consistent with how we treat all of our associates, at entry point and into and throughout their careers with us.

This article will discuss some best practices and ideas in making any new hire feel welcome to a hospitality organization while "coming up to speed." It will also consider strategies and techniques that will help keep unproductive misconceptions or misunderstandings from arising between employer and employee. 

Hospitality isn't a career for everyone, but there are ways to improve the odds and make the new hire our smart hire. While this article will apply to our entire hospitality organization, we will be focusing on the broad range of associates, the ones who interact with and care for guests, as opposed to higher level managers and the C-suite.

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Coming up in October 2018...

Revenue Management: Getting it Right

Revenue Management has evolved into an indispensable area of hotel operations, chiefly responsible for setting forecasting and pricing strategies. Because the profession is relatively new to the hotel and hospitality industries, a clear-cut definition of what exactly Hotel Revenue Management is has only recently emerged - Selling the Right Room to the Right Client at the Right Moment at the Right Price on the Right Distribution Channel with the best commission efficiency. Though the profession can be summed up in a single sentence, that doesn't mean it's easy. In fact, it's an incredibly complicated and complex endeavor, relying on mountains of data from a wide range of sources that must be analyzed and interpreted in order to formulate concrete pricing strategies. To accomplish this, Revenue Managers rely on an array of sophisticated technology systems and software tools that generate a multitude of reports that are central to effective decision-making. As valuable as these current technology systems are, much of the information that's collected is based on past historical trends and performance. What's new is the coming of big, data-driven, predictive software and analytics, which is likely to be a game-changer for Revenue Managers. The software has the capacity to analyze all the relevant data and predict occupancy levels and room rates, maximizing hotel profitability in the process. Another new trend that some larger hotel chains are embracing is an emphasis on Booking Direct. For Revenue Managers, this is another new channel with its own sales and costs that have to be figured into the mix. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.