Making the New Hire Our Smart Hire

By Mark Ricketts President & Chief Operating Officer, McNeill Hotels | April 15, 2018

It’s been reported that millennials decide within their first 48 hours with an organization whether they will stay on for an extended period of time. Talk about first impressions being the most lasting! 

But when we think about it, first impressions are important for all ages and experience groups. When guests arrive at our properties, the impression of their stay will often be indelibly forged by how things went at its very start. How did check-in go? Was he or she made to feel genuinely welcome by our staff? How did the room present itself upon that first opening of the main door or first peek into the bathroom? How did breakfast look and taste the next morning? And so on.

When we meet with a new supplier or industry partner, again, first impressions count for a great deal. Did we look our new colleague firmly in the eye? Did we ask the right questions or provide the answers that were being sought? The silent grading starts right then and there. The expectations of others and how we match them are essential to our success.

We must put the same care into the acquisition, training and career development process for our new hires. What we do at these stages must reflect what works best for our operating model and how we believe people should be treated within an organization.  Moreover, we must be careful about adjusting core procedures depending on whether the labor market is tight, or looser, at any given time.  Perhaps, above all else, we must be consistent with how we treat all of our associates, at entry point and into and throughout their careers with us.

This article will discuss some best practices and ideas in making any new hire feel welcome to a hospitality organization while “coming up to speed.” It will also consider strategies and techniques that will help keep unproductive misconceptions or misunderstandings from arising between employer and employee. 

Hospitality isn’t a career for everyone, but there are ways to improve the odds and make the new hire our smart hire. While this article will apply to our entire hospitality organization, we will be focusing on the broad range of associates, the ones who interact with and care for guests, as opposed to higher level managers and the C-suite.

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Coming up in August 2018...

Food & Beverage: Millennials Rule

The Millennial Generation has surpassed the Baby Boomers to become the largest living generation in America, and their tastes and preferences are being reflected in the Food & Beverage industry. In general, Millennials insist on more natural, healthier, less-processed food and beverage sources, and in part, this inspired the farm-to-table movement. However, now the trend is becoming even more pronounced and hyper-local. Millennials no longer simply want to know their food is farm-to-table, they want to know which farm, and where it's located relative to the community. As a result, hotel F&B directors are redesigning entire menus to feature area brewers, wineries, and family farms. Not only is this a proven way to satisfy Millennial tastes but it also opens the door for hotel guests to enjoy immersive experiences such as tours and excursions to local farms and breweries. Also, thanks in no small part to Millennials, coffee consumption is at an all-time high. In response, F&B directors are creating innovative ways to enhance the coffee experience for guests. Nitro-brewed coffee, cold brew, lattes on draft, and the introduction of unique milk options are part of this trend, as are locally sourced coffee beans where available. Millennial influences can also be found in the Craft and Artisan Cocktail movement where the same preferences for locally sourced and high-quality ingredients apply. One leading hotel even offers a drink menu featuring liquors infused with herbs recommended by experts for their health and well-being benefits. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.