5 Tips in Hotel Recruiting Transparency

By Zoe Connolly Co-Founder & Managing Director, Hospitality Spotlight | October 07, 2018

In nearly every industry, from government to social media, and education to hospitality, the term 'transparency' has gone beyond buzzword, and become part of the lexicon. In the HR world, there's salary transparency, leadership transparency, and yes, transparency has made its way into the hiring process.  
 
When recruiting, the moment a candidate's trust is lost is also the moment their interest in the position is gone. It's even worse if the candidate is hired and then quickly comes to understand that they were mislead. Regardless of the level of the opportunity and the experience of the candidate, they will talk to their network and your organization will have to live with it....whatever that may be. Below are 5 tips that will improve transparency throughout the hiring lifecycle. 

1. Be Transparent About What is Needed Within a Role

Successful team building has a number of components to it. On one hand, there is the obvious goal of finding people who interact well with each other. On the other, it can be about positioning each team member to take advantage of their strengths. It can also be about finding opportunities for growth, and building a funnel of talent to replace individuals who have been promoted. Regardless of the goals, as teams change, so to do the responsibilities for its members.

This places the onus on managers to to be forthcoming for current and prospective employees alike. When the need for a new employee arises, it's likely there is a description laying around from previous recruiting efforts. While this is a great place to start, hotel leadership must ensure that the description accurately reflects the desired position, and edit it to the needs of today. In many instances, the ability to accurately reflect a role will determine the quality of candidates who fit the description.

To build or refine an accurate description, it is important to review the hotel team and any changes that may have occurred since the last round of hiring, as well as discussing the role with current employees. In some instances, this can open up the ability to increase a current employee's responsibilities, while hiring to backfill other components of a role.

Exit interviews are also an important part of understanding the perception of a role, versus the realities. Exit interviews should include questions about day-to-day responsibilities, how a soon-to-be former employee might do differently in a manager's role, and information on how the old description has become obsolete. During exit interviews, hotel leaders may come to realize that as an employee this person took on more responsibilities than required, and probably should have been recognized for their effort. This might change the management approach to the new hire, or change the role itself.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Jerry Tarasofsky
Philip Antoon
Robert Plotka
Derek Olsen
Steven D. Weber
Rani Bhattacharyya
Michelle Millar
David Lund
Cid Jenkins
Paul Feeney
Coming up in June 2019...

Sales & Marketing: Selling Experiences

There are innumerable strategies that Hotel Sales and Marketing Directors employ to find, engage and entice guests to their property, and those strategies are constantly evolving. A breakthrough technology, pioneering platform, or even a simple algorithm update can cause new trends to emerge and upend the best laid plans. Sales and marketing departments must remain agile so they can adapt to the ever changing digital landscape. As an example, the popularity of virtual reality is on the rise, as 360 interactive technologies become more mainstream. Chatbots and artificial intelligence are also poised to become the next big things, as they take guest personalization to a whole new level. But one sales and marketing trend that is currently resulting in major benefits for hotels is experiential marketing - the effort to deliver an experience to potential guests. Mainly this is accomplished through the creative use of video and images, and by utilizing what has become known as User Generated Content. By sharing actual personal content (videos and pictures) from satisfied guests who have experienced the delights of a property, prospective guests can more easily imagine themselves having the same experience. Similarly, Hotel Generated Content is equally important. Hotels are more than beds and effective video presentations can tell a compelling story - a story about what makes the hotel appealing and unique. A video walk-through of rooms is essential, as are video tours in different areas of a hotel. The goal is to highlight what makes the property exceptional, but also to show real people having real fun - an experience that prospective guests can have too. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.