5 Tips in Hotel Recruiting Transparency

By Zoe Connolly Co-Founder & Managing Director, Hospitality Spotlight | October 07, 2018

In nearly every industry, from government to social media, and education to hospitality, the term 'transparency' has gone beyond buzzword, and become part of the lexicon. In the HR world, there's salary transparency, leadership transparency, and yes, transparency has made its way into the hiring process.  
 
When recruiting, the moment a candidate's trust is lost is also the moment their interest in the position is gone. It's even worse if the candidate is hired and then quickly comes to understand that they were mislead. Regardless of the level of the opportunity and the experience of the candidate, they will talk to their network and your organization will have to live with it....whatever that may be. Below are 5 tips that will improve transparency throughout the hiring lifecycle. 

1. Be Transparent About What is Needed Within a Role

Successful team building has a number of components to it. On one hand, there is the obvious goal of finding people who interact well with each other. On the other, it can be about positioning each team member to take advantage of their strengths. It can also be about finding opportunities for growth, and building a funnel of talent to replace individuals who have been promoted. Regardless of the goals, as teams change, so to do the responsibilities for its members.

This places the onus on managers to to be forthcoming for current and prospective employees alike. When the need for a new employee arises, it's likely there is a description laying around from previous recruiting efforts. While this is a great place to start, hotel leadership must ensure that the description accurately reflects the desired position, and edit it to the needs of today. In many instances, the ability to accurately reflect a role will determine the quality of candidates who fit the description.

To build or refine an accurate description, it is important to review the hotel team and any changes that may have occurred since the last round of hiring, as well as discussing the role with current employees. In some instances, this can open up the ability to increase a current employee's responsibilities, while hiring to backfill other components of a role.

Exit interviews are also an important part of understanding the perception of a role, versus the realities. Exit interviews should include questions about day-to-day responsibilities, how a soon-to-be former employee might do differently in a manager's role, and information on how the old description has become obsolete. During exit interviews, hotel leaders may come to realize that as an employee this person took on more responsibilities than required, and probably should have been recognized for their effort. This might change the management approach to the new hire, or change the role itself.

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Coming up in February 2019...

Social Media: Getting Personal

There Social media platforms have revolutionized the hotel industry. Popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube and Tumblr now account for 2.3 billion active users, and this phenomenon has forever transformed how businesses interact with consumers. Given that social media allows for two-way communication between businesses and consumers, the emphasis of any marketing strategy must be to positively and personally engage the customer, and there are innumerable ways to accomplish that goal. One popular strategy is to encourage hotel guests to create their own personal content - typically videos and photos -which can be shared via their personal social media networks, reaching a sizeable audience. In addition, geo-locational tags and brand hashtags can be embedded in such posts which allow them to be found via metadata searches, substantially enlarging their scope. Influencer marketing is another prevalent social media strategy. Some hotels are paying popular social media stars and bloggers to endorse their brand on social media platforms. These kinds of endorsements generally elicit a strong response because the influencers are perceived as being trustworthy by their followers, and because an influencer's followers are likely to share similar psychographic and demographic traits. Travel review sites have also become vitally important in reputation management. Travelers consistently use social media to express pleasure or frustration about their guest experiences, so it is essential that every review be attended to personally. Assuming the responsibility to address and correct customer service concerns quickly is a way to mitigate complaints and to build brand loyalty. Plus, whether reviews are favorable or unfavorable, they are a vital source of information to managers about a hotel's operational performance.  The February Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to effectively incorporate social media strategies into their businesses.