Promoting a Destination and In Turn Your Hotel

By Didi Lutz President, Didi Lutz PR | May 06, 2010

With the exception of popular metro cities that lure travelers around the clock, there are thousands of destinations that operate by the season, with some alive only for weeks out of the year. The nature of your destination affects hotel occupancy and the way you manage your business daily. Without presenting a specific town/city/island example, I would like to examine what it is like to factor into your public relations strategy the idea of destination public relations and marketing. While this is no easy task, there are ways to link the two and provide your location with the exposure it needs to become appealing to travelers. For you the goal is simple: when travelers and potential guests read about your destination they should automatically think of your hotel as the perfect place to stay. In order to do this, consider the following strategy and tweak it to fit your property's profile...

With the exception of popular metro cities that lure travelers around the clock, there are thousands of destinations that operate by the season, with some alive only for weeks out of the year. The nature of your destination affects hotel occupancy and the way you manage your business daily.

Without presenting a specific town/city/island example, I would like to examine what it is like to factor into your public relations strategy the idea of destination public relations and marketing. While this is no easy task, there are ways to link the two and provide your location with the exposure it needs to become appealing to travelers. For you the goal is simple: when travelers and potential guests read about your destination they should automatically think of your hotel as the perfect place to stay.

In order to do this, consider the following strategy and tweak it to fit your property's profile:

  • Research. I mention this in every article I write and the reason is because I know that planning and preparation provide knowledge and insight. With media research, you will determine what media outlets are appropriate for your audience. If your season is only a few months out of the year on a luxurious island, obviously you need to search for outlets that cover seasonal destinations for the upscale market. Ask your public relations professional to create a media list and create relationships with those reporters.

  • Work with local CVBs and Chambers of Commerce. Both are terrific sources of networking and destination information. As members, you get access to press leads, and media you wouldn't otherwise, as some reporters tend to call local tourism offices directly instead of the hotel directly. However, if your public relations manager is proactive, s/he will have created relationships with media who will often bypass the tourism offices and contact the hotel directly because they already know someone. Tourism offices can also help with creating destination packages to attract media, and can also provide additional information. Making use of these resources is worth the time and trouble, especially if you cannot afford to hire a publicist.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close
Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.