GMO Risks and How to Avoid Them

By Rani Bhattacharyya Community Economics Extension Educator , University of Minnesota Extension- Center for Community Vitality | August 26, 2012

With genetically modified foods entering consumer markets again this summer, the hospitality and food service industries need to decide how much liability they are willing accept concerning the risks that Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) pose to the public. To explore this issue, this article is divided into three sections: 1) what GMOs are and how they are regulated, 2) a listing of health risks that GMOs pose to your guests, and 3) strategies that hotels can use to avoid liability for these risks.

Definitions and Regulation

Silence concerning GMOs in the US is due, in part to a failure of federal regulators to establish a definition for GMOs that aligns with those used by the rest of the world. According to the USDA, FDA and EPA a Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) refers to organisms that have been altered by traditional breeding techniques or by molecular Genetic Engineering Methods (GEM). The EU and other countries however use the term GMO to refer specifically to products created from molecular genetic engineering (or bioengineering) methods developed since the 1970s. In this article, will use the international concept of GMOs. Anger over GMOs has also arisen since there is very little if any independent scientific information concerning the long-term effects on both humans and the environment resulting from production and consumption of newly engineered products. In the absence of providing farmers, biotech companies and the public a common language with which to develop a regulatory framework to "protect and promote our health", the FDA and other agencies are essentially refusing the American public the right to know what they are eating.

For a GMO crop to enter into production and the US marketplace, each of these agencies does have procedures for evaluating the risks posed by each product. In practice however, many of the trial GMO studies required by the USDA have failed to "contain" modified genetic material within trial plots, resulting in contamination of adjacent fields owned by farmers not participating in the studies. The farmers, in turn, are then being sued by biotech firms for infringing on intellectual property rights of the firms. The EPA also now lists proprietary GMO corn, cotton and potato varieties as (toxins) since they now contain chemicals used as herbicides and insecticides.

The FDA encourages voluntary consultations with companies developing GMOs, but law does not require formal product reports before they are cleared for industrial applications or sale.

Within this patchwork, three phases of genetic engineering have already been initiated since the 1990s. The first phase included crops now on the market and focused on increasing crop resistance to insecticides, herbicides and fungal/viral infections. The second phase is focused on ramping up plant resistance to extreme temperature and soil conditions and improving nutrient content. The third phase is working to develop crops that contain pharmaceutical additives like hormones and vaccines. While these scientific efforts have the potential to alleviate many of the worlds health issues and food shortages, the proprietary nature of the research and patenting being done by biotech companies leads many to believe their true aim is to monopolize both the world's agricultural resources and food supply.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Sridhar Laveti
Megan (Sterritt) Taylor
Sherri Merbach
Tony Heung
Tim Peter
Scott Watson
Stephanie Hilger
Lisa Cain
Kathleen Hayn
Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.