Stay Interviews: A Fresh Approach to Retaining Millennials

By Sherri Merbach Managing Director, C-Suite Analytics | March 04, 2018

High millennial employee turnover saps us of the talent they bring and the training we've given them. So how can we reduce turnover to leverage their skills and improve our own productivity? Let's start with some facts:

- Millennials today are 13 to 35 years old, and will comprise more than 1 of 3 adult Americans by 2020 and 75 percent of our workforce by 2025

- Millennials change jobs and companies 7 times by age 28, and 10 to 14 times by age 38

- The average time a millennial spends in one job with one company is just 2 years

Distracting Data 

High millennial employee turnover saps us of the talent they bring and the training we've given them. So how can we reduce turnover to leverage their skills and improve our own productivity? Let's start with some facts: - Millennials today are 13 to 35 years old, and will comprise more than 1 of 3 adult Americans by 2020 and 75 percent of our workforce by - Millennials change jobs and companies 7 times by age 28, and 10 to 14 times by age 38 - The average time a millennial spends in one job with one company is just 2 years .

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Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.