Stay Interviews: A Fresh Approach to Retaining Millennials

By Sherri Merbach Managing Director, C-Suite Analytics | March 04, 2018

High millennial employee turnover saps us of the talent they bring and the training we've given them. So how can we reduce turnover to leverage their skills and improve our own productivity? Let's start with some facts:

- Millennials today are 13 to 35 years old, and will comprise more than 1 of 3 adult Americans by 2020 and 75 percent of our workforce by 2025

- Millennials change jobs and companies 7 times by age 28, and 10 to 14 times by age 38

- The average time a millennial spends in one job with one company is just 2 years

Distracting Data 

High millennial employee turnover saps us of the talent they bring and the training we've given them. So how can we reduce turnover to leverage their skills and improve our own productivity? Let's start with some facts: - Millennials today are 13 to 35 years old, and will comprise more than 1 of 3 adult Americans by 2020 and 75 percent of our workforce by - Millennials change jobs and companies 7 times by age 28, and 10 to 14 times by age 38 - The average time a millennial spends in one job with one company is just 2 years .

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Coming up in December 2018...

Hotel Law: New Administration - New Policies

In a business as large as a hotel and in a field as broad as the law, there are innumerable legal issues which affect every area of a hotel's operation. For a hotel, the primary legal focus includes their restaurant, bar, meeting, convention and spa areas of their business, as well as employee relations. Hotels are also expected to protect their guests from criminal harm and to ensure the confidentiality of their personal identity information. These are a few of the daily legal matters hotels are concerned with, but on a national scale, there are also a number of pressing issues that the industry at large must address. For example, with a new presidential administration, there could be new policies on minimum wage and overtime rules, and a revised standard for determining joint employer status. There could also be legal issues surrounding new immigration policies like the H-2B guest-worker program (used by some hotels and resorts for seasonal staffing), as well as the uncertain legal status of some employees who fall under the DACA program. There are also major legal implications surrounding the online gaming industry. With the growing popularity of internet gambling and daily fantasy sports betting, more traditional resort casinos are also seeking the legal right to offer online gambling. Finally, the legal status of home-sharing companies like Airbnb continues to make news. Local jurisdictions are still trying to determine how to regulate the short-term apartment rental market, and the outcome will have consequences for the hotel industry. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.