Great Employee Experiences Drive Bottom Line Profits

By Joyce Gioia CEO, Employer of Choice International, Inc. | March 18, 2018

Worldwide, labor markets are tightening for top-notch hospitality professionals and for the lower levels and front-line as well. When you are recruiting a new team member, do you take steps to make that person feel valued? Do you and your team treat the applicant as an honored guest? Do you introduce the applicant to all of your people---not just folks s/he will be working with? Do you offer a tour of your property? When you do these things in the recruiting process, it will go a long way towards helping you win the war for talent.

How to Onboard Your Recruits

Once the new recruit is onsite, welcome the person the first day with a small gift. For housekeepers, the perfect small gift is clip-on picture frame they may use to keep pictures of loved ones with them on their carts. For office workers, including front desk and sales, it might be a mug of candy. Always consider a "welcome card" signed by the other members of the department or if you have a very small property, have it signed by everyone.

Orientation Is an Important Time

Orientation is often a make or break experience. Send the paperwork home so that people may review it with their spouses or significant others, ahead of time. In a small property, the orientation will frequently be conducted by the general manager or one of the department heads. That orientation must include showing the new recruit the Big Picture of the property, including what happens with guests when they arrive to check-in. When you show people that Big Picture, they are better able to understand the value that they bring and what is lost/missing, when they do not show up for work.

Interestingly, this small addition to your onboarding procedure will result in lower absenteeism and typically a higher level of engagement. When we conducted our research for the book How to Become an Employer of Choice (Oakhill Press, 2000), we discovered that the number one driver to employee engagement and retention was seeing how their job contributed to the organization.

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Coming up in December 2018...

Hotel Law: New Administration - New Policies

In a business as large as a hotel and in a field as broad as the law, there are innumerable legal issues which affect every area of a hotel's operation. For a hotel, the primary legal focus includes their restaurant, bar, meeting, convention and spa areas of their business, as well as employee relations. Hotels are also expected to protect their guests from criminal harm and to ensure the confidentiality of their personal identity information. These are a few of the daily legal matters hotels are concerned with, but on a national scale, there are also a number of pressing issues that the industry at large must address. For example, with a new presidential administration, there could be new policies on minimum wage and overtime rules, and a revised standard for determining joint employer status. There could also be legal issues surrounding new immigration policies like the H-2B guest-worker program (used by some hotels and resorts for seasonal staffing), as well as the uncertain legal status of some employees who fall under the DACA program. There are also major legal implications surrounding the online gaming industry. With the growing popularity of internet gambling and daily fantasy sports betting, more traditional resort casinos are also seeking the legal right to offer online gambling. Finally, the legal status of home-sharing companies like Airbnb continues to make news. Local jurisdictions are still trying to determine how to regulate the short-term apartment rental market, and the outcome will have consequences for the hotel industry. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.