Top Five Characteristics of Financially Successful Spas

By Jane Segerberg Founder & President, Segerberg Spa Consulting, LLC | August 09, 2010

Spas are almost a rite of passage for hotels and resorts. Is your spa not only a rite of passage but also a financially successful asset to your property? A successful spa attracts guests to your resort/hotel, receives high acclaim from guests, contributes to overall guest satisfaction and desire to retire, adds revenue dollars to the overall property and strengthens occupancy rates.

As you can imagine, this article is about numbers and how to raise them. There is one number that we first want to consider and that is the number five. According to Miller's Magic Number, the number seven (or between five and nine) is the number of items which can be held in short term memory at any one time. To ensure that the following characteristics are remembered, the five most important keys to financial success have been selected.

Successful spas are characterized by the following memorable five:

1. The Spa Concept Strongly Defines its Distinguishing Factors

There is no doubt about it; a successful spa exudes a sense of place, a certain feeling, an experience. A simply stated yet strong concept provides the focus necessary to be a leader, to be recognized and create brand loyalty. The concept is the seed from which to build a strong story and additional distinguishing factors for the spa.

The concept guides the spa's architectural program, d'ecor, the service program, the menu of services and special signature features. A strong concept is not developed by copying bits and pieces of existing spa menus or by copying another spa's philosophy. There should be a synergistic match between the spa's concept and the core business and DNA of the resort or hotel property. It also addresses the future needs, wants and desires of a very savvy spa clientele.

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