Service First Aid

By Roberta Nedry President & Founder, Hospitality Excellence, Inc. | January 08, 2012

Good doctors get sued. Nice doctors don't. This poignant statement, made by a malpractice attorney, reveals how legally dramatic the difference can be when professionals of any kind take the time to be nice.

In the hospitality industry, problems will happen - it's inevitable. Guests will be unhappy or discontent - that's unavoidable. What doesn't have to be inevitable and what can be avoidable is the wrong staff reaction and the resulting damage or loss. Angry guests get angrier when the flames of their emotions are fanned. Just like the good doctor/nice doctor analogy, untrained employees may unknowingly intensify a situation by simply not understanding how to calm a guest down.

Learning how to diffuse potential upsets before they get out of control is not only smart, it is a very effective risk management strategy - reducing the risks of added costs and losses of escalation*.* It is wise relative to avoiding litigation that could take place. When people feel they have been treated poorly or unfairly, they may choose to seek resolution elsewhere. In our highly litigious society, hospitality leaders and their employees should do everything in their power to avoid that scenario. Good and responsive service is not only an important business strategy to generate revenue and add dollars; it's also a prudent strategy to keep revenue in house and make sure dollars are not subtracted from the bottom line.

Steve Grover, a Harvard educated, south Florida maritime attorney who represents clients in personal injury lawsuits against cruise lines and other businesses, believes that hospitality providers are much more likely to be sued when their staff becomes less hospitable following an on-site accident. "When people are injured on cruise ships or in hotels, they expect to be treated compassionately. When that does not happen, I believe it prompts many guests to bring negligence lawsuits who would not do so otherwise. The guest who thinks the accident was the fault of the ship or hotel simply becomes more resolved to seek justice in a court of law." From his interviews with many potential clients soon after their accidents aboard ships and in hotels, Mr. Grover believes that the hospitality often diminishes once guests voice their opinion that ship or hotel personnel were to blame. "At that point, it is human nature for hotel management and staff to take offense. But from a risk management perspective, that is precisely the moment at which hospitality should be specifically directed towards this now-special guest. It is a very small price to pay compared to a lawsuit. And it's good business in general."

One example of an accident gone awry further than it needed to included a woman who seriously injured an ankle on a cruise. She could not get around because of the injury and complained to the ship's staff. After her message, she felt she purposely got little to no assistance from the ship's crew the rest of the voyage. She felt trapped in her room because she was not ambulatory. This "added insult to injury" and forged her resolve of suing for negligence. Had the crew reached out to her a bit more, even if she was not in the best of spirits and empathized with her frustration of being on a cruise and not being able to go anywhere, she might have been less disgruntled. They could have made extra phone calls to check on her, had nice amenities sent to her room, figured out how to comfortably get her out of her room and arrange ways for her to still participate in the events and meals on Board. Instead, she was left alone feeling neglected which increased her animosity toward the cruise personnel.

When guests are upset and problems or accidents take place, employees must immediately jump into action and proactively address the situation. Upset guests can also be difficult guests which might motivate employees to avoid challenging encounters. Yet, when they avoid the tough moments they actually make it tougher for everyone, especially their organization. Employees who are empathetic and who genuinely show concern have a much greater opportunity to diffuse or manage problems and accidents than those who don't care or appear indifferent. Active and responsive caring is critical. Robotic, procedural behavior is not. Keeping good service alive and well is essential in the positive as well as the negative moments.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Leora Halpern Lanz
Paul van Meerendonk
Andrew Glincher
Bill Boyar
Jennifer Nagy
Vanessa Horwell
Daniel Croley
Laurence Bernstein
Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.
John Tess
Coming up in June 2019...

Sales & Marketing: Selling Experiences

There are innumerable strategies that Hotel Sales and Marketing Directors employ to find, engage and entice guests to their property, and those strategies are constantly evolving. A breakthrough technology, pioneering platform, or even a simple algorithm update can cause new trends to emerge and upend the best laid plans. Sales and marketing departments must remain agile so they can adapt to the ever changing digital landscape. As an example, the popularity of virtual reality is on the rise, as 360 interactive technologies become more mainstream. Chatbots and artificial intelligence are also poised to become the next big things, as they take guest personalization to a whole new level. But one sales and marketing trend that is currently resulting in major benefits for hotels is experiential marketing - the effort to deliver an experience to potential guests. Mainly this is accomplished through the creative use of video and images, and by utilizing what has become known as User Generated Content. By sharing actual personal content (videos and pictures) from satisfied guests who have experienced the delights of a property, prospective guests can more easily imagine themselves having the same experience. Similarly, Hotel Generated Content is equally important. Hotels are more than beds and effective video presentations can tell a compelling story - a story about what makes the hotel appealing and unique. A video walk-through of rooms is essential, as are video tours in different areas of a hotel. The goal is to highlight what makes the property exceptional, but also to show real people having real fun - an experience that prospective guests can have too. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.