Recipe for a Sustainable Service Culture: The Essential Ingredients

By Nigel Lobo Vice President of Resort Operations, Grand Pacific Resorts | May 28, 2010

To make a service culture a reality everyone needs to be on board. This includes the top level executives all the way down through all of the line level associates. Not only does everyone need to buy into the concept and implementation but also play a part in the development of the concept and processes. For, in fact, we with a passion for a service culture know that the process begins with the heart of our operation, the staff members who interact with our guests on an ongoing basis.

In order for a culture of Service Excellence to grow and thrive, the resort operations team must have a burning desire for it to be that way, and the energy to ensure that this desire spreads throughout the resort and kept alive.

Memorable Vacations are Created by Going Above and Beyond.

Our "Building Service Culture" process was rolled out in the last quarter of 2008. The development of the program was across all 14 of the resorts managed by Grand Pacific Resort Management. The course of action focused on specific Associate and Guest satisfaction strategies.

Associate Satisfaction strategies centered on providing associates with feedback and recognition, as well as getting them totally involved in the key elements, such as the development of their own resort credo and goals.

For instance, one resort team came up with "Building Friendships through Genuine Hospitality" as their motto. Another went for "All Hands on Deck". This exercise got the ball rolling with everyone from housekeeping to the front desk providing their input and voting on the final outcome.

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