Landscaping During a Drought

By Ken Hutcheson President, U.S. Lawns | November 22, 2015

According to a 2014 study from the University of California-Davis, last year's drought was likely to inflict $2.2 billion in losses on the agricultural industry. Harsh drought seasons have led to habitat destruction, wildfires, and have also caused entire landscapes to change. In severe and prolonged seasons, droughts reduce the quality of soil and promote soil erosion, which can result in the loss of the landscape all together.

However, by working with your contractor to create the right preparation plan that includes vegetation selection and proper irrigation methods, hoteliers can protect and increase the durability of their landscapes.

Preparation

Implementing a comprehensive drought preparation plan is the key to preventing landscape upheaval during periods of drought. One way hoteliers can achieve this is by choosing grass, flowers, trees, and other vegetation that require less water. These landscape features are particularly important because they're features that hoteliers can plan and control before drought season begins. Below you will find a more in depth look at each of these landscape features.

Grass

Hoteliers understand how important it is for their properties to maintain a crisp, clean, and overall attractive appearance. And since grass is one of the largest components of the exterior landscape, it's critical that it upholds both its green color and strength. In order to accomplish this, hoteliers should work with their contractors to identify which species of grass is the most appropriate for their climate and location. Hoteliers need to look for options that are both drought tolerant and low maintenance. It's important to point out that there's a direct correlation between maintenance and drought-tolerance, so choosing a low maintenance grass can also help you reduce water runoff, lower irrigation costs, and increase its overall lifecycle.

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