Tips on Leveraging Hotel Data to Reach Your Profit Goals

By Paul van Meerendonk Director of Advisory Services, IDeaS Revenue Solutions | January 21, 2018

Data is heralded as the core of intelligent and gainful decision-making. It's been reported that companies at the top of their industry for data-driven decision-making are 5% more productive and 6% more profitable than their competitors 

It's safe to say "data" is not on the list of topics nobody is talking about. Data -- what data to use, where to use it, how to use it and when to use it – has been strategically dissected at the corners of nearly every industry discussion to date. Over the years, the pool of data sources hotels utilize within their business strategies has grown exponentially larger. The propagation of its importance within the development of short- and long-term vision and strategic planning has also become more commonplace than in years past.

Innovative breakthroughs in technology and analytics mean organizations continue to see more opportunities to leverage data in meaningful ways. However, the alternative side is the steep volumes of data can be dauntingly large and intricately complex.

Some organizations liken this complex data environment to needing a bigger boat for a sea of data. But when it comes to capitalizing on industry data, size isn't what matters. Organizations that focus on using the right types of data -- with an infrastructure that can effectively leverage it -- can confidently reach ambitious profit goals.

An era of big data requires that critical business information is not just easily accessible, but easily digested and understood. In many organizations, data related to operational forecasting, revenue forecasting and annual budgets are housed in different systems and accessed by different departments. This disconnect between both systems and departments can inevitably lead to inefficiencies and manual errors.

Establishing the Ideal Mix of Data 

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Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.