The Easiest Way to Achieve Your Goals - It's All in Your State of Mind

By Debbie Bermont President, Source Communications | May 19, 2010

Everyone knows that if you want to achieve a goal, you need a well thought out plan and a timetable to implement the plan. It seems like a relatively simple process that would make any goal obtainable. This makes sense in theory, but in reality the best of intentions many times turn into un-kept promises to yourself or others, a missed business deadline, a downturn in sales or a decrease in productivity.

Your mindset is the fundamental barometer which will dictate whether you are more likely to succeed or fail in reaching any goal. This includes a sales goal, a management goal or a personal productivity goal. The goal could be small or large. It doesn't matter. Your success or failure will be dependant upon what type of mindset you adopt before you take action to achieve your goal. If you adopt the right mindset before you implement your plan of action, you will have a much greater chance of success.

When you adopt a specific mindset permanently it becomes your state of being and will forever influence the way you make decisions and prioritize your actions.

When you adopt the right mindset that is congruent in supporting your goal, you will consistently focus all of your actions on reaching your goal. Here's an example to illustrate the point about how your state of being influences the way you prioritize your actions. Helen Jones, the Director of Sales for Hotel ABC, is an extremely organized person. Her office is always tidy. She doesn't have any files sitting on top of her desk unless it is a file that she needs to use immediately. Her computer work station is always clear. Her office is always clean when she leaves to go home. Helen's state of being is organized. She places a priority on keeping her work space organized so she immediately puts away anything she is not using. She doesn't need to set aside special periods of time to organize her office.

Howard Smith, Director of Catering for Hotel XYZ, is the opposite. Being organized is not his normal state. His office is usually in a state of disarray. When he's in the middle of a project he has files on his desk, his chair and his floor. He has papers and contracts everywhere. He has stacks of business mail, **correspondence and articles sitting on top of his office cabinet. Frequently his desk is a mess when he leaves his office at night. Soon the piles of paper and files start mounting up and eventually important pieces of paper get buried on his desk. Then he has to stop what he's doing just to search for what he needs. About every four weeks he plans to get organized. He sets aside a large chunk of time to go through the stacks of paper in his office to get them organized. Keeping papers filed away is not a priority to him and ultimately he spends five times longer getting his office into an organized state than it takes Helen.

Helen places a high importance on being organized so she sets a high priority on immediately filing away any paper that is not being used. Being organized is a desire of Howard's but it is not his state of being so he doesn't place a priority on immediately filing away paper he's not using. Eventually he ends up spending wasted time searching for information in his disorganized office. There are many days when he leaves the office and mentally sets a goal to straighten it the next morning. Then as soon as he gets to work his phone rings or he must run to a meeting and he ends up turning his attention to other matters instead of organizing his office. Without the permanent mindset of being organized he loses focus and determination to reach his goal of organization.

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Guest Service: A Culture of YES

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