Five Key Areas to Retaining Great Hotel Salespeople

By Suzanne McIntosh President, McIntosh Human Capital Management | March 05, 2017

Great hotel salespeople are hard to find. Our Sales Leaders and Talent Recruiting Professionals commit time, money and energy recruiting for high performing, passionate and productive salespeople. Our best salespeople consistently drive revenue, inspire confidence and loyalty with our customers, generate new business, increase brand trust and contribute to the company culture. Conversely, turnover is expensive and negatively impacts our property's performance. Successful leaders must cultivate engaging environments and maintain high business standards to retain their salespeople and to create successful teams.

We all strive to create an effective, cohesive sales team, led by an inspiring and motivating leader who consistently drives results. Your salespeople have done a great job of creating relationships and confidence in your service delivery and guest experience. Customers look at turnover of your sales organization as an indicator of "something wrong" with the hotel or company. When they leave, this confidence can be shaken and the client may follow your salesperson to your competition.

In this article, we will explore the five key ways sales leaders can retain their salespeople and what other contributing factors prevent sellers from leaving to join the competition:

  1. Provide a clear path of career development and advancement.
  2. Provide competitive compensation, meaningful incentive plans and extend sincere recognition
  3. Create a culture built on trust.
  4. Have solid brand integrity and consistent service delivery.
  5. Communicate clearly and openly about major organizational changes, mergers and integrations

1. Setting a Clear Path for Career Opportunities

Aggressive, highly motivated salespeople are always looking for ways to advance their career and increase their earning potential. While a certain amount of "comfort" in a role is important, a complacent Sales Manager will not be looking for the new business and expanding the markets you need to grow your business.

Hospitality salespeople look at their company and leadership to provide a clear path for their growth and career progression. If you give them a realistic and timely road map as to what to expect as their next career step, they are more likely to stick with you. If the company is not growing (or worse retracting), or long term leaders are not "going anywhere", high performing salespeople will look elsewhere to progress their careers. Unfortunately, in the meantime, you have a potentially unmotivated and bored team member, that effects their performance and the entire sales team's morale.

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