Prince Waikiki Appoints Joy Tomita Anderson as Director of Sales and Marketing

USA, Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii. October 17, 2019

Prince Waikiki announced today the appointment of Joy Tomita Anderson as director of sales and marketing. An industry veteran with a strong presence in the Hawaii hospitality industry, Anderson will oversee all sales, marketing and public relations initiatives for the 563-room Honolulu hotel, including its signature 100 Sails Restaurant & Bar, expansive meeting and events space and the 27-hole championship golf course, Hawaii Prince Golf Club.

"We are thrilled to welcome Joy to the Prince Waikiki family," said Joshua Hargrove, general manager of Prince Waikiki. "Her expertise of the destination and extensive connections throughout Oahu paired with her ability to strategically lead the growth of our business makes her a valuable addition to our executive leadership team."

Anderson brings over 20 years of Honolulu hospitality experience to the Prince Resorts Hawaii collection. Most recently, she served as director of sales and marketing at the Queen Kapi'olani Hotel, where she led the property's re-branding and re-positioning. Previously, Anderson has held sales and marketing roles at notable hotels and visitors bureaus throughout Honolulu including The Modern Honolulu, Hotels and Resorts of Halekulani, Oahu Visitors Bureau and Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau.

A lifelong Oahu resident, Anderson graduated from the University of Hawaii at Manoa with a bachelor of science in travel industry management and a bachelor of arts in dance theater. She currently sits on the advisory boards for Hawaii Tourism Japan, Hawaii Tourism Oceania, Hawaii Tourism Canada and Hawaii Tourism Europe.

Located in the heart of Honolulu's most vibrant and diverse neighborhoods, and around the corner from Ala Moana Center and the Kaka'ako community, Prince Waikiki - the #1 of 87 Hotels in Honolulu on TripAdvisor - features an impressive 563 modernized guest rooms and luxury suites with breathtaking floor-to-ceiling ocean views across 33 towering floors of oceanfront accommodations and world-class service. The centrally located hotel in Honolulu features top-rated restaurants including its award winning 100 Sails Restaurant & Bar, an open-air lobby lounge showcasing contemporary Hawaiian artwork and grab-and-go dining with Honolulu Coffee Company café, multiple use indoor and outdoor event venues, a stunning infinity pool overlooking the Ala Wai Yacht Harbor and more.

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Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

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