Recruitment Basics: Sell Your Hotel, Your Team and Your Goals

By Zoe Connolly Co-Founder & Managing Director, Hospitality Spotlight | September 23, 2018

People, colleagues, human capital, teammates, coworkers (whatever you choose to call it) are the most important factor in executing against a hotel or travel tech company's vision. As such, it's imperative to attract the right candidates, and sell them on the long term goals.

Candidates that buy into the overall company vision will have a clear understanding of who they'll be working for and what they'll be spending all their time working towards. We do, after all, spend quite a bit more time at work then we do anywhere else, which means helping people see what they're building towards, the vision, is incredibly important at every step of the employment lifecycle. Below are a few tips on how best to sell yourself as an employer to your candidates and future employees, as well as how to keep the vision alive for employees.

Brand Your Hotel

Today, a hotel's brand is about more than the logo on the door, and more than the 'customer promise' that hotels publish on their website. It includes elements like location. Is a property in the middle of downtown or does it get a lot of foot traffic from convention center attendees? Is there a music hall nearby that brings in international guests? If the property is close to the capital of the state or any other unique tourist locations, these can be critical components in building a property's brand.  Candidates appreciate knowing what they'll be packaging for their guests, and if they're local, might even find out about places they were unaware of.

For current employees, it's important for hotel leadership to keep its finger on the pulse of what's happening in a neighborhood. If a new bar is opening up (one that doesn't compete with the restaurant on the property), it may behoove the hotel management to be aware of it, and convey early thoughts. It's always best when hotel employees can speak about their town based on their experience, but if the information can't be first hand, management can offer basic feedback about local establishments.

A property's bran also includes the key internal features. Does a hotel have free bikes for guests, a great award winning spa, a Michelin Star restaurant and/or anything else unique about it? If so, share this information with candidates and employees alike. If there are extra rooms now and then, treat them to the hotel experience. This is a great courting practice for candidates, and a reminder for employees about what they're trying to accomplish. Again, this is about creating the ability to speak to the hotel on a personal level.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Michael Wildes
Paolo Boni
Michael Coughlin
Kristie Willmott
Nicholas Tsabourakis
Andrew Freeman
Tom O'Rourke
Eric Blanc
Brett Tabano
Steve Kiesner
Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.