Partnerships Bring Local Flare to Hotel Design

By Hans Van Wees General Manager, Hotel Vermont | November 06, 2016

While home-sharing companies capture attention for truly immersive local experiences, and brands respond to the movement with sub-brands touting authenticity, independent hoteliers have long appreciated the localized approach to business. In Burlington, Vermont, such local partnerships build and bond communities, and through their contribution to the hotel design, product and programming, ultimately enhance the overall guest experience.

The current state of the travel industry suggests the sharing economy is here to stay. These home-sharing companies are rapidly increasing in popularity as travelers crave - and ultimately, trust - their hosts to serve as sources of information for where locals really go to eat, explore, shop, etc. While brands have taken notice and are creating sub-brands to serve as their authentic, immersive answer to this consumer shift, in Vermont, our approach to hospitality is neither contrived nor fabricated; our localized approach to community is simply who we are.

At Hotel Vermont, we operate under the belief that partnerships are about building community, not just one individual entity. Stronger communities create not only a stronger business environment, but a better place to live, work and enjoy as a visitor. The partnerships have contributed not only to our hotel product, but to the overall guest experience, making our entire team trusted local hosts.

When we first started this project in downtown Burlington almost seven years ago, our goal was to create a hotel experience that offered true local flavor. We identified that there was a need in the market for an upscale, modern spin on the traditional Vermont getaway. Owned, developed, and designed locally, keeping everything close to home allowed us to hone in on the aesthetic provided by Vermont's natural beauty and sense of community to create partnerships that bring the very best of the state to our guests.

Often in hotel design, architects and designers are steeped in the heritage of their destination, so we were fortunate to have such a talented team locally who could grasp our vision. Starting from the ground up, we contracted Burlington-based Smith Buckley Architects and TruexCullins Interiors to spearhead all of the hotel design elements. Throughout the planning process, we wanted to capture the essence of Vermont to create a clean, minimalist design. Drawing on Scandinavian influence and Vermont's rich maker history, we were able to marry the two to create a warm, inviting and modern, yet rustic space.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Sherri Merbach
Tim Peter
Sridhar Laveti
Scott Watson
Bruce Seigel
Suzanne McIntosh
Terence Ronson
Chris Green
Gaurav Varma
Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.