Tuning Out, Tuning In With Himalayan Salt

By Ann Brown Founder, Saltability | July 08, 2018

In a world of computers and smartphones and a continual drive toward the next best thing, technology permeates every corner of our day-to-day lives. We're connected in ways we've never been before, which can be wonderful for building community and promoting business on a national and even international scale, but with that constant connection comes high levels of stress - our "plugged-in" lives are not only exhausting us mentally but also physically, as they throw off our bodies' natural frequencies and leave us drained and unbalanced as a result.

Ideally, hotels and spas are places of rest and relaxation, but how do we promote a spa-like atmosphere for guests and travelers who arrive with smartphone in hand and business on the brain? Pure Himalayan salt, with its 84 naturally occurring minerals, is a natural combatant to the negative impact of toxic frequencies we live with every day. By harnessing its healing properties in skillfully designed ways, hotels and spas can create a calming environment that physically counteracts stress and promotes greater health and overall balance.

Why It Works

The earth is surrounded by an electromagnetic belt, which brings with it an electromagnetic field of vibration, known as the Shumann resonance frequency. This frequency is measured at 7.83 Hz (cycles) per second, which is the resonant frequency of the earth. That same 7.83 Hz per second is also the ideal resonant frequency of each of the mammals that live on the earth, including humans.

Without interference, human bodies remain at that ideal resonant frequency, keeping their bodies balanced. However, all of our electronic devices, with their varying wavelengths and resonant frequencies, disrupt the natural, ideal resonant frequency within our bodies. This rings especially true in our homes and offices, where we keep so many of these electronics.

Fortunately, Himalayan salt can naturally rebalance the body by neutralizing the artificial electromagnetic wavelengths that so often surround us. Both chemically and physically, salt is considered a neutral primal element. In its neutral state, salt crystals exhibit the exact same resonant frequency as the earth itself.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

James Gieselman
T. Dupree Scovell
Sridhar Laveti
Andrea Sheehan
Charles de Gaspe Beaubien
Johan Terve
Katherine Kies
Janelle Schwartz
Yatish Nathraj
Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.