Tuning Out, Tuning In With Himalayan Salt

By Ann Brown Founder, Saltability | July 08, 2018

In a world of computers and smartphones and a continual drive toward the next best thing, technology permeates every corner of our day-to-day lives. We're connected in ways we've never been before, which can be wonderful for building community and promoting business on a national and even international scale, but with that constant connection comes high levels of stress - our "plugged-in" lives are not only exhausting us mentally but also physically, as they throw off our bodies' natural frequencies and leave us drained and unbalanced as a result.

Ideally, hotels and spas are places of rest and relaxation, but how do we promote a spa-like atmosphere for guests and travelers who arrive with smartphone in hand and business on the brain? Pure Himalayan salt, with its 84 naturally occurring minerals, is a natural combatant to the negative impact of toxic frequencies we live with every day. By harnessing its healing properties in skillfully designed ways, hotels and spas can create a calming environment that physically counteracts stress and promotes greater health and overall balance.

Why It Works

The earth is surrounded by an electromagnetic belt, which brings with it an electromagnetic field of vibration, known as the Shumann resonance frequency. This frequency is measured at 7.83 Hz (cycles) per second, which is the resonant frequency of the earth. That same 7.83 Hz per second is also the ideal resonant frequency of each of the mammals that live on the earth, including humans.

Without interference, human bodies remain at that ideal resonant frequency, keeping their bodies balanced. However, all of our electronic devices, with their varying wavelengths and resonant frequencies, disrupt the natural, ideal resonant frequency within our bodies. This rings especially true in our homes and offices, where we keep so many of these electronics.

Fortunately, Himalayan salt can naturally rebalance the body by neutralizing the artificial electromagnetic wavelengths that so often surround us. Both chemically and physically, salt is considered a neutral primal element. In its neutral state, salt crystals exhibit the exact same resonant frequency as the earth itself.

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Coming up in November 2018...

Architecture & Design: Expecting the Unexpected

There are more than 700,000 hotels and resorts worldwide and the hotel industry is continually looking for new ways to differentiate its properties. In some cases, hotels themselves have become travel destinations and guests have come to expect the unexpected - to experience the touches that make the property unlike any other place in the world. To achieve this, architects and designers are adopting a variety of strategies to meet the needs of every type of guest and to provide incomparable customer experiences. One such strategy is site-integration - the effort to skillfully marry a hotel to its immediate surroundings. The goal is to honor the cultural location of the property, and to integrate that into the hotel's design - both inside and out. Constructing low-impact structures that blend in with the environment and incorporating local natural elements into the design are essential to this endeavor. Similarly, there is an ongoing effort to blur the lines between interior and exterior spaces - to pull the outside in - to enable guests to connect with nature and enjoy beautiful, harmonious surroundings at all times. Another design trend is personalization - taking the opportunity to make every space within the hotel original and unique. The days of matching decor and furniture in every room are gone; instead, designers are utilizing unexpected textures, mix-and-match furniture, diverse wall treatments and tiles - all to create a more personalized and fresh experience for the guest. Finally, lobbies are continuing to evolve. They are being transformed from cold, impersonal, business-like spaces into warm, inviting, living room-like spaces, meant to provide comfort and to encourage social interaction. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.