Staffing Solutions for the Hotel Industry

By Jerome G. Grzeca Founder & Managing Partner, Grzeca Law Group, S.C. | December 04, 2016

Hotels, like other U.S. companies, are struggling to find solutions to staffing shortages. Every month, more than a quarter-million Americans turn 65, which is a trend that has profound workforce and economic consequences in this country. In addition, unemployment rates continue to fall, dropping to 4.9% nationwide in September 2016. These changes, along with other factors like increases in occupancy rates and high labor costs, have resulted in many hotel companies having trouble finding and hiring qualified workers for open positions.

Of course, it's not an option for the rooms not to be cleaned or for the meals not to be prepared and served when employees are hard to find. This leaves current staff working too much overtime, leading to additional owner expense, as well as employee dissatisfaction and turn-over. To solve these problems, hotels are thinking outside the box, and when all else fails while trying to find local workers, they start looking abroad. As a full-service immigration firm for several international hotel companies, we often receive calls from clients asking us to help them solve these labor shortages by hiring foreign national employees. While many hotel companies utilize work visas for professional (TN, H-1B, L-1B) and managerial (L-1A, E-2) employees, many do not take advantage of options available to them with respect to "low-skilled" labor to supplement their workforce. This article focuses on immigration options that hotels may not have considered before, some of which are listed here.

Temporary Immigration Solutions

I. Temporary Need – H-2Bs

This visa classification, known as the H-2B, was designed specifically for a "temporary need" where the employer cannot find qualified U.S. workers. The temporary need, usually less than 9 months, can be a one-time occurrence, a seasonal need, a peak load need or an intermittent need. Unlike other visa categories, there is no need for the employees to have a certain level of education or experience outside of what the hotel requires for this position. Therefore, this is one of the few immigration options available for "non-professional" positions (defined by immigration as positions that don't require at least a Bachelor's Degree).

There are several planning considerations when pursing an H-2B visa classification. First, these types of visas are "capped," and there are only so many available each year. While the year is broken into two parts for the cap, it is possible for the government to run out of numbers at any time, so an employer who had planned to file a petition might lose their opportunity. Therefore, if an employer is interested in pursuing an H-2B visa classification, it would start the immigration work at least 5 months prior to when it would need the employees to start work. In addition, H-2B petitions can only be filed for citizens of certain countries (please see the current list here: https://www.uscis.gov/working-united-states/temporary-workers/h-2b-temporary-non-agricultural-workers#H2-B%20Countries). Furthermore, there are several rules about payments for H-2B workers; for example, they must be paid at least the prevailing wage in the work area, all visa and petition expenses must be paid by the employer, and the employer must pay for their transportation to and from the U.S.

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Coming up in February 2019...

Social Media: Getting Personal

There Social media platforms have revolutionized the hotel industry. Popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube and Tumblr now account for 2.3 billion active users, and this phenomenon has forever transformed how businesses interact with consumers. Given that social media allows for two-way communication between businesses and consumers, the emphasis of any marketing strategy must be to positively and personally engage the customer, and there are innumerable ways to accomplish that goal. One popular strategy is to encourage hotel guests to create their own personal content - typically videos and photos -which can be shared via their personal social media networks, reaching a sizeable audience. In addition, geo-locational tags and brand hashtags can be embedded in such posts which allow them to be found via metadata searches, substantially enlarging their scope. Influencer marketing is another prevalent social media strategy. Some hotels are paying popular social media stars and bloggers to endorse their brand on social media platforms. These kinds of endorsements generally elicit a strong response because the influencers are perceived as being trustworthy by their followers, and because an influencer's followers are likely to share similar psychographic and demographic traits. Travel review sites have also become vitally important in reputation management. Travelers consistently use social media to express pleasure or frustration about their guest experiences, so it is essential that every review be attended to personally. Assuming the responsibility to address and correct customer service concerns quickly is a way to mitigate complaints and to build brand loyalty. Plus, whether reviews are favorable or unfavorable, they are a vital source of information to managers about a hotel's operational performance.  The February Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to effectively incorporate social media strategies into their businesses.