The Sheraton Denver Downtown Embarks on $80 Million Phased Renovation

USA, Denver, Colorado. October 30, 2019

The Sheraton Denver Downtown this week announced the official start of an $80 million hotel renovation that will change the face of the hotel and the 16th Street Mall. Sheraton Denver Downtown has long been an anchor in Downtown Denver, serving as the largest events hotel in the city with unmatched heritage and deep roots in the local community. Once transformed, the hotel will reflect the new Sheraton experience, making it one of the first to do so in North America.

"Sheraton is at the dawn of a new era and there is no better hotel than Sheraton Denver Downtown to bring this new vision to life," said Indy Adenaw, Vice President and Global Brand Leader, Sheraton Hotels. "As Marriott International's most global brand, we are very excited to see this transformation happen across the globe, one community at a time."

Sheraton Denver Downtown is one of the Sheraton brand's flagship properties. Its transformation journey will touch all aspects of the hotel including a new arrival experience, 133,000 square feet in renovated meeting space and 1,231 newly redesigned guest rooms.

"The renovation will serve to highlight what is already incredible about the local Denver community- and bring the best of the Sheraton brand to downtown. These changes will strengthen Denver's position as a gathering place for groups, conventions, guests and locals alike, and will act as a town center for our growing, evolving city," included Tony Dunn, General Manager for the Sheraton Denver Downtown.

The new ownership group, Denver HS-EF Court Place, LLC, a joint venture between High Street Real Estate Partners (Atlanta, Ga.) and Eagle Four Partners (Newport Beach, Calif) purchased the Sheraton Denver Downtown in September 2018, and has developed a major renovation plan for the hotel that completely reimagines the public spaces and guestroom experience. In addition, the owners will work closely with the hotel team to continue to position the property as the best place to stay in Downtown Denver by adding new guest touch points to the hotel such as world class beverage and culinary offerings, Sheraton Club and much more.

"As proud owners of the Sheraton Denver Downtown, we are committed to being an integral part of the downtown Denver community," said Kory Kramer, Partner with Eagle Four Partners. "Our substantial plan will continue to position the Sheraton as Denver's premier group meeting and events hotel, benefitting from a close proximity to the best Denver has to offer, including the Convention Center, arts and sports venues, all in one of the nation's hottest markets."

Sheraton Denver Downtown will start this transformation with the removal of the 5 iconic 18-foot ballerina statues that have welcomed guests and passersby since they were installed in 1997. The ballerinas will find a new home in the Denver Arts District on Santa Fe, and their departure will make way for an improved guest arrival experience and modernized exterior, which will comprise the first phase of the renovation. The full timeline includes:

- Lobby/Driveway/Restaurants/ Club Lounge: Timeline: August 2019 - April 2020

- Guestrooms: Timeline: November 2019- April 2020

- Plaza Ballroom and Foyer: Timeline: December 2019 to January 2020

- Newly reimagined hotel to be unveiled in April 2020

Tynan Group LLC, will oversee the development as the Project Management Company. Johnson Nathan Strohe (JNS) will serve as the lead architect on the renovation of the hotel's porte-cochere, façade and public spaces, while Kay Lang & Associates serve as the interior designer for the Plaza Ballroom. PWI Construction will serve as the general contractor for the public spaces.For the guest rooms, Gensler will serve as the architect and interior designer and Digney New York is the general contractor.

Drawing inspiration from the grandeur and light of I.M. Pei's original design, the new porte-cochere, lobby entry, and signature bar create a striking statement at the east end of 16th Street mall.

"Our design intention is to embrace the history of this iconic building while creating modern spaces that people will want to sit down and enjoy today," said Heather Vasquez Johnson, associate principal at Johnson Nathan Strohe. "The architectural design is an interpretation of I.M. Pei's distinctive approach to materials, architectural form and light."

The interior design incorporates various design elements and materials inspired by the beatnik movement of the early 1960s, a time of exuberant growth and cultural change in the United States. The design of the plaza lobby evokes the spirit of the traveler with canvas, leather and darkened metal finishes. A new fireplace in the lobby nods to Pei's original tower design, featuring a plaster imprint of the historic ceiling tiles that remain on the tower's second level. The faceted glass architecture of the new signature bar is reminiscent of a cut crystal whiskey glass.

Denver, like many American cities, suffered a severe economic decline during the 1970s as businesses and residents moved to the suburbs. As a remedy, Denver embarked on a massive revitalization effort initiated by the construction of the 16th Street Mall. Designed by the firm of I.M. Pei and Partners in collaboration with Hanna/Olin (now called OLIN), the Mall included custom paving and street furniture, Skyline Park and the Courthouse Square: a mid-20th century project consisted of 4 buildings: the first major development in any American city to combine a 22-story deluxe hotel (now the Tower plaza), 4-story department store (now the Plaza Building), 4-level underground parking & public space that included the Zeckendorf plaza and a skating rink.

Over the last decade, the 16th Street Mall has experienced its share of challenges, and while the north end of the mall, anchored by Union Station, has seen substantial improvements and a thriving commercial district, the south end needs some new life and enhancements. In working closely with City officials and the Downtown Denver Partnership, Sheraton Denver Downtown and the larger Sheraton brand hope this renovation will not only improve the guest experience but will also serve as the catalyst for a transformative change to the south end of the 16th Street Mall, that will help attract more tourists, businesses and patrons to the area.

"Denver is a thriving city, and our downtown has seen unprecedented growth and transformation over the recent years, and the Sheraton continues to serve as an anchor for the 16th Street Mall and for Downtown Denver as a whole," said Tami Door, CEO of Denver Downtown Partnership. "The Sheraton is a world-class amenity for our center city. This renovation is well-timed as we continue to attract large-scale events and conferences, and as we continue to grow as a city."

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Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

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